Keynote

Margo Kane is a nationally and internationally acclaimed interdisciplinary artist of Cree and Saulteaux heritage.  She is a storyteller, dancer, singer, animator, video and installation artist, director, producer, writer, and teacher, and she often works with urban and rural Aboriginal communities with a commitment to performance that is socially empowering.  Her work has emerged from physically-based exploration of story using techniques that cross cultural and creative boundaries.  Her solo performance works include, Reflections in the Medicine Wheel, O Elijah, We’ve Always Been Here, Childhood Burial, Memories Springing/Waters Singing, I walk I Remember, Confessions of an Indian Cowboy, and Moonlodge.  Currently, she is the Artistic Managing Director of Full Circle First Nations Performance. 


Keynote

Michael Greyeyes is a graduate of the School of Theatre and Dance at Kent State University and the National Ballet School of Canada.  One of Canada’s leading Aboriginal performers, he has appeared in numerous films and television shows.  Also a playwright, choreographer, and director, his works bring both experience and a fresh voice to Canadian Aboriginal drama.


Keynote

Petra Kuppers is a disability culture activist, a community performance artist, and a Professor at the University of Michigan. She also teaches on Goddard College’s Low Residency MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts. She leads The Olimpias, a performance research collective (www.olimpias.org). Her Disability Culture and Community Performance: Find a Strange and Twisted Shape explores The Olimpias’ arts-based research methods. She is the author of a new textbook, Studying Disability Arts and Culture: An Introduction. Her other works include Disability and Contemporary Performance: Bodies on EdgeThe Scar of Visibility: Medical Performance and Contemporary Art, and Community Performance: An Introduction. She spoke at the 2013 Native Women Language Keepers: Indigenous Performance Practices Symposium. (See her at 3:22 of this video.)


Reading

Yvette Nolan is a playwright, director, and dramaturg.  Her plays include Annie Mae’s Movement, Ham and the Ram, The Birds (a modern adaptation of Aristophanes’ comedy), Alaska, and The Unplugging.  From 2003-2011, she served as Artistic Director of Native earth Performing Arts.  Medicine Shows, her book about Native theatre in Canada, will be published in the fall.  She was recently awarded the Mallory Gilbert Leadership Award for leadership in the Canadian theatre community.


Reading

Daniel David Moses is a playwright, poet, essayist, and teacher.  He is a Delaware from the Six Nations lands in southern Ontario, Canada. He holds an Honours B. A. in General Fine Arts from York University and an M. F. A. in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia. His plays include his first, Coyote City, a nominee for the 1991 Governor General’s Literary Award for Drama, The Indian Medicine Shows, a winner of the James Buller Memorial Award for Excellence in Aboriginal Theatre and, his best known, Almighty Voice and His Wife. He is also the author of Delicate Bodies and Sixteen Jesuses, poems, and co-editor of Oxford University Press’ An Anthology of Canadian Native Literature in English, 3rd Edition, 2005. His most recent publications are Pursued by a Bear, Talks, Monologues and Tales (2005) and Kyotopolis, a play in two acts (2008), both from Exile Editions. His honours include the Harbourfront Festival Prize, a Harold Award, a Chalmers Fellowship and being short-listed for the 2005 Siminovitch Award. He teaches as a Queen’s National Scholar in the Department of Drama at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario.


Artist

Amy Malbeuf is a multidisciplinary visual artist from Rich Lake, Alberta, Canada. She utilises a variety of mediums including performance, installation, sculpture, caribou hair tufting, beadwork, and digital media. Malbeuf has exhibited and performed nationally.


Artist

Adrian Stimson is a member of the Siksika (Blackfoot) Nation in southern Alberta. He is an interdisciplinary artist, curator and educator with a BFA with distinction from the Alberta College of Art & Design and MFA from the University of Saskatchewan. As an interdisciplinary artist, Adrian’s work includes paintings, installations, collodion wet plate photography, sculpture and performance. Recent exhibits and performances include, Witnesses at the Belkin Gallery, UBC, Vancouver, Reconsidering Reconciliation, TRU, Kamloops, The Shaman Exterminator, On the Trail of the Woodcraft Indians with the Buffalo Boy Scouts of America, Paved Arts, Saskatoon, Making Treaty 7, Calgary.


Artist

Lori Blondeau, MFA, is of Cree, Saulteaux, and Metis heritage from Saskatchewan.  Her work explores the influence of popular media and culture on Aboriginal self-identity, self-image, and self-definition.  Her recent work examines the impact of colonization on traditional and contemporary roles and lifestyles of Aboriginal women.


Artist

Julianne Beaudin-Herney is an emerging visual and performance artist of Mik’Maq and Cree heritage from Regina. Her work focuses on Indigenous Arts. She uses her experiences in ceremony to influence her artwork, which involves the oral institution of ceremony.  Her work has been recognized by the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan and the Office of the Treaty Commissioner, and her latest installation is being shown at the Mackenzie Art Gallery.


Artist

Spy Denomme-Welch, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Education at the University of Regina.  He is of Anishnaabe heritage from Ontario.  He is a multidisciplinary scholar and artist, who writes, composes, performs and produces work in theatre, opera, and video.  His current work focuses on Indigenous opera creation, cross-cultural collaboration and decolonizing performance practices.  He has won the prestigious President Susan Mann Dissertation Award, and he wrote, co-composed, and co-produced the Dora-nominated opera, Giiwedin.  He is the Artistic Director of An Indie(n) Rights Reserve.


Artist

Catherine Magowan has been principal bassoonist with the Sudbury Symphony Orchestra since 2002 and regularly performs across Ontario. Her electric bassoon band, Das Fagott Mannschaft (“the bassoon team” in German) has been making a splash in and around Toronto. Other work for Magowan and Spy Dénommé-Welch includes the composition of shorter works for chamber ensemble, including Deux Poèmes Sur La Formation Des Glaces and Bike Rage, which won the 2013 Baroque Idol composer competition.


Artist

Edward Poitras is a Métis artist based in Regina, Saskatchewan. A member of the Gordon First Nation and resident of Treaty Four Territory, he works in diverse media and extends beyond the borders of identity to consider the self in global terms. For Border Zones Poitras chose to look closely at structures of inclusion and exclusion within communities, whether geographically determined or across established boundaries. His installation, entitled Cell (2010), was initially inspired by the incarceration of Leonard Peltier, and suggests that political and personal borders may be both enforced and desired.

His new performance for Performing Turtle Island is presented by New Dance Horizons, which was founded in 1986 by Robin Poitras and Dianne Fraser, and has become nationally recognized for celebrating new visions in Canadian contemporary dance.


Artist

The Collective Performance Storytelling Ensemble is a professional intercultural group of artists all from Regina who come together to create performances from their collective histories, traditional and contemporary.

Dominic Gregorio, Sophie Bouffard, Lacey Morin-Desjarlais, Jesse Archibald-Barber, Michele Sereda, Ayesha Mohsin, Janine Windolph, Ahmad Abdul Ghani (standing in for Mohammad Saadoun).

Dominic Gregorio, Sophie Bouffard, Lacey Morin-Desjarlais, Jesse Archibald-Barber, Michele Sereda, Ayesha Mohsin, Janine Windolph, Ahmad Abdul Ghani (standing in for Mohammad Saadoun).

                  Erroll Kinistino

                  Erroll Kinistino


Reading

Floyd Favel is from the Poundmaker Reserve where he currently resides. He works as a playwright, journalist, essayist and director. He studied theatre at the Native Theatre School, The Tukak Teatret of Denmark ( a school for Greenlandic Inuit and Scandinavian Sami), and at the Centro di Lavoro di Grotowski with the theatre innovator Jerzy Grotowski of Poland. His work crosses a broad range of disciplines and he has been presented or published nationally and internationally. He has developed his own theatre training methods and theories based on Indigenous ritual and social structures, a theatre process he calls Native Performance Culture. His researches, investigations and presentations have taken him across the world and he is focusing on the next phase of his creative journey, that being, investigations into theatre/indigenous tradition/healing and health and cultural rejuvenation.


Reading

Ursula Neuerburg-Denzer, PhD, is a performer, director and scholar, who currently holds a position as assistant professor of Theatre at Concordia University. She studied movement, directing, and acting in Germany and the US. Neuerburg-Denzer's research and teaching interest focuses on emotion studies for performers, and the connection between historical performance styles and contemporary practice. She is a certified rasaboxes instructor. Her research interests involve the effects of war and other situations of extreme pressure on the human being and how these states have been and can be expressed on stage. This interest has led her to investigate the housing situation on Canadian reserves. A theatrical project in collaboration with Cree playwright and theatre maker, Floyd Favel "Attawapiskat is no Exception" was developed and performed at Concordia in April 2014. Currently, Favel, Edee O'Meara and Neuerburg-Denzer are preparing a new project focusing on the story of the people from Lake St. Martin.


Speaker

Brad Bellegarde, aka InfoRed, is a hip hop artist of Nakota and Cree heritage from Little Black Bear First Nation, SK.  He has been recording music since 2000 and has worked with artists from across Canada and the United States.  In 2009, he was a guest artist in Vancouver for the 2010 Winter Olympics as part of the Cultural Olympiad which featured hundreds of artists from across Canada.  He has given spoken word performances at UBC and the Mackenzie Art Gallery, and he performed for the Prince of Wales in 2012.


Speaker

Dione Joseph is theatre practitioner with a professional and academic background in the performing arts. Working from a community and cultural engagement position, she has spent the past ten years acting, producing, directing and dramaturging works as well as having published extensively as a cultural journalist, stage critic and arts investigator. She has traveled internationally to China, Canada, Austria, Mexico, the UK and USA to continue developing her craft and this has led to an expanding body of scholarship in a range of different areas in the arts with an emphasis on performance. In 2015 she has been commissioned to undertake a new project "Towards a NZ dramaturgy" that seeks to bring together voices of New Zealand's actors, playwrights, producers, directors, choreographers, and of course dramaturges to explore through conversation what this highly contested word could mean for Aotearoa in the future.


Speaker

Marjorie Beaucage is a Métis Two Spirit woman who has been active in the community as a film and video-maker, cultural worker and educator since the early ’90s.  Part of her responsibility as a Two Spirit is to be a helper, teacher, guide, advocate. Her life work has been about creating social change, working to give people the tools for creating possibilities and right relations. Whether in the classroom, community organizations, or the arts, her goal has been to pass on the stories, knowledge and skills that will make a difference for the future.  More recently, she has been the Elder at Camp Fyrefly. It has confirmed once again that so much more is needed to support Indigenous youth and communities when it comes to Sexual Health and Gender Identities in ways that are culturally and spiritually safe.


Speaker

Emilie Monnet  is an Interdisciplinary artist based in Montreal. She founded Onishka Productions in 2011 to present performance-based work created from unique collaborations between artists of different cultures and disciplines. Combining theatre, performance, and media arts forms, her work explores the interconnections between identity, memory, imagination, and language by telling stories that weave the symbolic realms of dreams and mythology, both personal and collective. Emilie co-directed and performed Bird Messengers with Moe Clark, for which both artists were awarded the LOJIQ prize for best Art/Culture project of 2011. In May 2012, she directed Songs of Mourning, Songs of Life, in collaboration with the Aboriginal women’s drum group Odaya and the Rwandan traditional musical ensemble, Komezinganzo, which reflected on the imprints of genocide. More recently she presented recompose, an interdisciplinary performance created in collaboration with Aboriginal artists across Canada, at Festival Phenomena. Emilie has two works in development: writing a play inspired by her great great-grandmother and a recurrent dream of a beaver, and the creation of a performative video walk addressing the many layers of History in Montreal. A graduate of Ondinnok’s theatre training program in partnership with the National Theatre School of Canada (Montreal, 2007), Emilie also studied media arts and holds a Masters in Peacebuilding and Conflict Resolution from Deusto University, Spain and from Uppsala University, Sweden. Her artistic engagement is inspired by her work with indigenous organizations in Canada and Latin America as well as community art projects with incarcerated women and Aboriginal youth. Emilie’s roots are Anishnaabe and French, and she lives in Montreal. 


Speaker

Jo-Anne Episkenew, PhD, is the Director of the Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre at the University of Regina and First Nations University of Canada. She is of Metis heritage from Manitoba, and is the author of the award winning Taking Back Our Spirits: Indigenous Literature, Public Policy, and Healing.  She has directed a major research project on Indigenous Literatures as applied literatures, narrative medicine, narrative policy studies, and trauma studies, all relating to the role of artists in the health of Aboriginal communities.


Speaker

Lindsay Knight, aka Eekwol, is an award-winning hip hop performing artist living in Saskatoon, originally from Muskoday First Nation, SK. Eekwol uses her music and words to spread messages of resistance, revolution and keeping the language, land and culture alive for the next generations. 
Through her original sound she displays her activist roots by living and creating as a supporter of both Hip Hop and Indigenous culture and rights. Along with music and academic work, Eekwol frequently works with young people across the country as a mentor and helper. She achieves this through performances, workshops, speaking events, conferences and programs.  She has completed her MA and currently teaches at the University of Saskatchewan.


Speaker

Chris Merk, aka Merky Waters, is a Regina Saskatchewan based Hip-Hop producer, DJ, beat boxer and educator. He has been DJing in Regina since 1998 and producing Hip-Hop music since 2001, recording and performing with fellow Saskatchewan artists Def 3, Eekwol, InfoRed and many more. Along with his musical production and performance endeavors, he is also heavily involved in the community as a workshop facilitator teaching youth the value of Hip-Hop culture, electronic production and rhythm. He has been an employee of the Regina Public School Board in the CREATE program since 2010, an Arts Education student at the University of Regina since 2011, and an administrative assistant at the University of Regina’s IMP Labs since 2012.


Speaker

James Daschuk, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies at the University of Regina.  He is the author of the award-winning book, Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life.  He is a researcher with the Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit.


Speaker

Shauneen Pete, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Education and the Executive Lead for Indigenization at the University of Regina.  She is of Cree heritage from Little Pine First Nation, SK.  She is a professional storyteller and is experienced with Indigenous performance traditions, sharing her knowledge with schools and community groups.


Speaker

Rebecca Caines, is an award-winning interdisciplinary artist and scholar, whose work crosses between creative technologies, contemporary performance and improvisation, site-specific art practices, and community-engaged art. She is co-developing the new Creative Technologies area at the University of Regina and is a co-applicant on the 2.5 million dollar SSHRC funded partnership The International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI), directing the new Regina Improvisation Studies Centre (RISC). Her recent practice-based research projects include Community Sound [e]Scapes: Northern Ontario, a collaborative sound art, video and new media project in remote First Nations communities. Her work with improvisation and new technologies has been incorporated in a number of community projects in health settings. She has published internationally, including her co-edited book on improvisation, Spontaneous Acts: The Improvisation Studies Reader, with Ajay Heble for Routledge. http://www.rebeccacaines.org; soundescapes.improvcommunity.ca


Speaker

June Scudeler is a Metis PhD candidate in English and Aboriginal literature at the University of British Columbia and President of the Vancouver Metis Community Association.  Her dissertation explores new traditions in Cree and Metis Two-Spirit, gay and queer narratives. Her essay on Metis poet Gregory Scofield was included in the Queer Indigenous Studies collection. June is a collective member of the Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival.


Speaker

Randy Lundy teaches Indigenous literatures at Campion College, University of Regina.  He was born in northern Manitoba and is a member of the Barren Lands First Nations.  In his first collection of poetry, Under the Night Sun (1999), Lundy writes about love, loss, and longing, and then goes on an exploration of the natural world in his second collection, Gift of the Hawk.


Speaker and Filmmaker

Warren Cariou, PhD, is a writer, documentary filmmaker, Associate Professor of English and Director of the Centre for Creative Writing and Oral Culture at the University of Manitoba. Cariou specializes in the areas of Aboriginal Literature, Creative Writing, Oral Culture, and Psychoanalytic and Postcolonial Theory. In 1999 he published a book of short stories: The Exalted Company of roadside Martyrs. This was followed up in 2002 with his memoir Lake of the Prairies. His current work is concerned with Indigenous human rights with a focus on seeking out indigenous voices in order to see how indigenous people are responding to corporate incursions into their land and their lives. His films "Overburden" and "Land of Oil and Water" are both about the human rights of indigenous people who are facing environmental, economic and cultural devastation as a result of oil sands developments in northern Alberta and Saskatchewan. 


Speaker and Filmmaker

Armand Ruffo is a creative writer and Queen's National Scholar in Indigenous Literatures and Languages. A member of the Sagamok Ojibway and Chapleau Cree Fox Lake First Nation, Armand is a respected scholar whose work has been instrumental in establishing Aboriginal Literary Studies in Canada. His creative work has been recognized by a wide array of honours and awards: his volume of poetry At Geronimo’s Grave won the Archibald Lampman Award for Poetry in 2001 and selections from it won the Canadian Author’s Poetry Prize. His film A Windigo Tale garnered multiple prizes in 2010 including Best Picture at the 35th Annual American Indian Film Festival in San Francisco and the Best Feature film at the Dreamspeaker Film Festival in Edmonton.


Filmmaker

Janine Windolph is primarily identified as a performer, producer/director, multimedia storyteller and entrepreneur. She is a Cree-German scholar with a Master of Fine Arts Interdisciplinary in Media Production and Indian Fine Arts. Most of her work centres on family stories, such as More Questions Than Ancestors, Diom and NFB's Lifegivers: Honouring our Elders and Children (award-winning: Best of Saskatchewan). She has worked in puppetry Joshua and Witiko Psychosis. As a performer, she is a member of the Collective Performance Storytelling ensemble, and together they presented Transactions. Janine is a Multimedia Producer representing RIIS Media Project and Co-Director of RIIS From Amnesia. She has worked as a statement gatherer for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and is president of both mispon – an Indigenous Filmmaking Festival – and the RIIS Commemorative Association, INC. She also serves for Creative Kids Saskatchewan. Currently, she is the Co-Producer, Co-Director and Co-Writer of Land of Rock and Gold, a Micro Telefilm budget feature film to be shot in La Ronge, Saskatchewan and produced out of Regina.

129ac34.jpg

Filmmaker

candy-fox.jpg

Candy Fox is a Cree actor and filmmaker from the Piapot First Nation. She is a recent graduate of the University of Regina where she attained her Bachelor of Fine Arts for Film Production. She is known for her work on Moccasin Flats, Rabbit Fall, Moccasin Flats: Redemption, and The Sabbatical – as well as her recent award-winning film, Backroads. Candy's work is strongly influenced by her identity and th connections she holds closely to her family, history, and community. She is currently doing an artist residency for the North American Indigenous Games Legacy Project as well as creating short documentary films for RezX TV.


Speaker

Megan Davies is an MA student in Theatre and Performance Studies at York University, ON funded by SSHRC through a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship. She holds a BA degree from the University of Fraser Valley, BC with an English Honours major and a Theatre minor. Her current research interests include historical reenactments, Indigenous theatre and performance art, decolonizing methodologies, Canadian theatre history and site-specific performance.


Speaker

Annie Smith is a drama instructor at Grand Prairie Regional College.  She holds a PhD in Participatory Performance and Pedagogy from the University of British Columbia.  Her theatre and research interests include participatory performance, Aboriginal theatre and performance, multicultural performance, interdisciplinary collaboration, and ensemble directing.  She has published articles and book reviews in alt.theatre magazine, Canadian Theatre Review, and Theatre Research in Canada.  She is a member of Theatre Alberta, Alberta Playwrights’ Network, Canadian Association for Theatre Research, Association for Theatre in Higher Education.


Speaker

Kahente Horn-Miller, PhD, is the New Sun Visiting Aboriginal Scholar in the School of Canadian Studies at Carleton University. As an active member of her community, Dr. Horn-Miller researches and writes on Indigenous methodologies, Indigenous women, identity politics, colonization, Indigenous governance, and consensus-based decision making for her community and the wider society. Her governance work and community-based research involves interpreting Haudenosaunee culture and bringing new life to old traditions. She continues to work with the research advisory for the Kahnawà:ke Diabetes Prevention Project, along with writing and publishing in her areas of interest, most notably her recent work on participatory democracy and Sky Woman’s story.


Speaker

Bruce Sinclair is a Metis artist originally from Meadow Lake/The Battlefords, Saskatchewan. He has worked in professional and community theatre since 1986 when he was invited into a drama class at SUNTEP at the University of Saskatchewan. He has worked with Twenty-Fifth Theatre, Native Earth Performing Arts, 4th Line Theatre, Waweyekisik Theatre, The Batoche Theatre Co. and recently with Undercurrents Theatre and Jumblies Theatre. Bruce has worked as an actor, director, playwright and producer for numerous First Nations and Metis theatre works and is striving to become fluent in nehiyawewin (Cree) and Michif. He has worked as a Theatre Officer at the Canada Council for the Arts for over a decade and teaches school on the rez and in the city. He currently is the Artistic Director of miyoteh performance  based at Big Island Lake Cree Nation in Saskatchewan. miyoteh performance recently co-hosted mamawi keyokewin, a gathering of elder storytellers, artists and dreamers with The Crossing Theatre Co near Batoche, SK  August 2015.  ahki meyimo (do your best)


Speaker

Curtis Peeteetuce is an actor, writer, director, and musician of Cree heritage from Beardy’s and Okemasis First Nation, SK. He has written over twenty plays, twelve of which have been produced.  His work celebrates Aboriginal language, culture, and history, by incorporating them through comedy, drama, music, and dance theatre.  He is currently the Artistic Director of the Saskatchewan Native Theatre Company.


Speaker

Carol Greyeyes is an actor, writer, director, teacher and arts administrator. She studied at the University of Saskatchewan where she received a Bachelor of Fine Arts and a Bachelor of Education. She acted and taught in both her home province of Saskatchewan and in Alberta before moving to Toronto to pursue a MFA from York University. After graduation, Carol worked in theatre and the film and television industry as an actor and screenwriter. She was nominated for a Dora Mavor Moore Award for Best Actress for her work in theatre.


Speaker

Carmen Robertson.png

Carmen Robertson, PhD, of Lakota/Scottish ancestry, is currently an Associate Professor of Art History at University of Regina. She teaches curatorial studies and Indigenous art history courses. Recent curatorial ventures include co-curated projects with Sherry Farrell Racette in the form of Clearing a Path, an exhibition of contemporary Saskatchewan work done in Indigenous media, and Cherished Things, that brought together contemporary Indigenous arts from the Saskatchewan Arts Board Collection. She curated Real Estate: Ceremonies of Possession for the Art Gallery of Regina. Robertson has also curated exhibitions for the MacKenzie Art Gallery, First Nations University of Canada, and University of Regina. Robertson has co-edited an exhibition catalogue and contributed catalogue essays including “On the Road with Bob” in the Bob Boyer retrospective catalogue and has an essay in the forthcoming exhibition catalogue that will accompany the upcoming exhibition on the Professional Native Indian Artists Incorporated (PNIAI). Robertson recently co-wrote Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers (2011) published by University of Manitoba Press.


Speaker

Rick Kotowich is an educator with Native Health Services, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region.


Speaker

Amanda Schenstead works as a music therapist in Palliative Care with the Regina Qu'Appelle Health Region providing care to patients in Regina Wascana Grace Hospice, Unit 3A at the Pasqua Hospital, and the Palliative Home Care Program. Amanda has a great interest in arts based research and has presented her major research project: "Performing Musical Liberation" at both national and international conferences. In addition to a music therapy degree, Amanda holds a Bachelor Degree in Music from Brandon University with a Major in Flute Performance and Minors in English and Theatre. In her spare time, she acts with Regina Little Theatre Company.

Speaker

Rick Kotowich is an educator with Native Health Services, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region.


Speaker

Erin Goodpipe is a proud member of Standing Buffalo Dakota Nation. Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, she has lived across western Canada and now finds home closer to her roots in Regina, Saskatchewan. Currently she attends classes at the University of Regina with a major of anthropology in the faculty of Arts. She works with the Aboriginal Student Centre where she assists in the development of the nitôncipâmin omâ, first year student success program, and she is a research assistant at the Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre.


Playwright and Director

Tara Beagan is a writer, actor, and director of Ntlakapamux and Irish “Canadian” heritage. She completed nearly three years of service as Artistic Director at Native Earth Performing Arts in December 2013. Beagan then co-founded with Andy Moro the Indigenous arts activist company ARTICLE 11, which celebrates Article 11 of the UN’s Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples through practice. She has been playwright-in-residence at the National Arts Centre, NEPA and Cahoots. Her plays have been produced by UnSpun Theatre, NEPA, Factory Theatre, Urban Curvz, Crate Productions, KICK Theatre, Caravan Farm, Wrecking Ball, Praxis Theatre, mysterious entity, Theatrefront, Theatre North West, Western Canada Theatre, Gateway, Saskatchewan Native Theatre, and Persephone.


Actor

Dakota Hebert is an actor of Dene heritage from Meadow Lake, SK, where she began her acting career. She was the first Aboriginal student accepted into Globe Theatre’s 2012 Conservatory Program. She has since performed with the Globe Theatre, the Saskatchewan native Theatre Company, Western Canada Theatre, Quest theatre, and Gateway Theatre. She has also served as Artist-in-Residence, Circle of Voices Program Assistant Coordinator, Drama Camp Facilitator, and Apprentice Artistic Director. She recently starred in Falen Johnson’s Salt Baby, directed by Yvette Nolan, and will be starring in Tara Beagan’s In Spirit for the Performing Turtle Island Gathering.


Designer

Andy Moro is a Toronto-based Euro/Cree with roots in Windsor, Moosefactory, Cochrane & Hearst Ontario, northern Italy and somewhere in the Netherlands. Andy has toured extensively, implementing and operating his own designs internationally since 1990. He is a core member of the creative team at the Banff Centreʼs Indigenous Dance Residency, co-founder and director the multi-disciplinary organization Red Pepper Spectacle Arts, and he facilitated the Production Mentorship Program at the Centre for Indigenous Theatre. Andy has worked with Native Earth Performing Arts, New Harlem Productions, Young People’s Theatre, VideoCabaret, Red Sky Dance, Dancemakers, Debajehmujig Theatre, Actor’s Repertory Company, Buddies in Bad Times, Sky Gilbert’s Cabaret Company, Daniel MacIvor’s dada kamera, Kaha:wi Dance Theatre, Western Canada Theatre, Saskatchewan Native Theatre, Halfbreed Productions, Michael Greyeyes’ Signal Theatre and many more. He is a multi-award winner and nominee and has twice been named among Toronto’s NOW magazine top-10 theatre artists. Upcoming is the Cross Canada tour of Beagan’s In Spirit, Signal Theatre/NAC’s A Soldier’s Tale, VideoCabaret’s Trudeau and the continuation of the WCT/Gateway/Persephone/SNTC Dreary and Izzy by Tara Beagan. Andy is a proud founder and director, with Tara Beagan, of Article 11, a new creation and production company that celebrates Article 11 of the UN’s Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples through practise.


Director

Jane Heather is an associate professor in the Department of Drama at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton Canada. She teaches acting, directing, and performer-created and community-based theatre. Interested in how theatre can activate communities and foster social change, Jane has created, written, directed, and produced community-based theatre projects with Indigenous youth and adults, teachers, seniors, counselors, prison inmates, unions, women’s groups, new immigrants, adults with disabilities, and many social agencies and organizations. She has published in Canadian Theatre Review, Routledge’s Applied Theatre Reader, and University of Michigan’s Performing Democracy. Her book (co written with Jan Selman) Theatre Teens Sex Ed: Are We There Yet? was published by the University of Alberta Press in 2015. Two plays she wrote for young audiences, Work Plays (2004 – 2013) and Are We There Yet? (1999- 2013) have been seen by thousands of teens across Alberta and the country. Are We There Yet? is a participatory play for 12 –16 year olds about sexual decision-making and sexual health, and Work Plays for 15 –18 year olds is about workers’ rights. Recent popular theatre work includes Seasons, a play about poor youth and elders in the inner city, and A Musta Be: Maskihkiy Maskwa Iskwew (with Old Earth Productions), a play about Indigenous women and inter-generational trauma – this play is featured at the Performing Turtle Island Gathering.


Filmmaker

18450_256396823169_7473951_n.jpg

Peter Brass is a Saulteaux filmmaker and a graduate of the First Nations University of Canada. His films focus on the contemporary experiences of Indigenous people in Canada. He is currently in the MFA program in creative writing at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe.


Filmmaker

Trudy Stewart is a Cree storyteller hailing from Flying Dust First Nation, Saskatchewan and based in Regina. She has a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film and Video Production from the University of Regina.  Trudy works in documentary, dramatic narrative, and comedy as a writer, director, and producer. She also works in communities as a youth workshop facilitator and acts as Festival Director for the mispon: Indigenous Film Festival in Regina.  She also produces the popular mispon Festival Podcast, which focuses on Indigenous media artists with listeners from around the world.  After acting as a Statement Gatherer for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, much of Trudy's work focuses on Indian Residential School legacy.  As a multimedia producer with RIIS Media Project since early 2014, she has co-written, directed, and edited the documentary, RIIS from Amnesia, and also produced several shorts on the Regina Indian Industrial School.  She is currently working as Production Coordinator on The Land of Rock and Gold, a dramatic feature to be shot in La Ronge, Saskatchewan, in late 2015.


Filmmaker

Louise BigEagle is of Nakota heritage from Ocean Man First Nation. She is completing her BFA in Film and Media Studies at the University of Regina. A writer of poetry, short fiction, and screenplays, her interest in filmmaking leans towards documentaries and short films. She is currently working with the Regina Indian Industrial School (RIIS) Media Project in Regina.


Speaker

Dominga Robinson is the Outreach Coordinator at SaskCulture. She has worked as the Cultural and Ceremonies Manager for the 2014 North American Indigenous Games and the Indigenous Program Coordinator with the Saskatchewan Writers’ Guild. Her play, Two Spirits, was produced by the First Nations University’s and UR Theatre’s Indigenous Performance Production program in 2012.


Moderator

Heather Igloliorte is an Inuk curator and art historian from the Nunatsiavut Territory of Labrador and an Assistant Professor of Aboriginal art history at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. Her teaching and research interests center on Inuit and other Native North American visual and material culture, circumpolar art studies, performance and media art, the global exhibition of Indigenous arts and culture, and issues of colonization, sovereignty, resistance and resilience. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Native North American Art Studies Association, and was recently appointed to the Board of Directors of the Otsego Institute for Native American Art History at the Fenimore Art Museum. She also serves on the Indigenous Advisory Council of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights and is currently working with the Nunatsiavut Territory on several ongoing and multiplatform collaborative community-based projects.


Artist

Brett Graham (Ngati Koroki), is an artist from the sub-tribe Ngati Koroki Kahukura, Aotearoa (New Zealand). His work explores his dual Maori and European heritage, though is often concerned with issues affecting Pacific and Indigenous peoples today. He is regarded for his ability to abstract complex historical ideas into evocative sculptural forms creating compelling and wry artistic statements. The multi-faceted nature of his sculptures and installations enables the viewer to engage with his work on an aesthetic, personal, and historical level. Graham has exhibited at the Sydney Biennale (2006, 2010) and his collaboration with Rachael Rakena exhibited at the 52nd Venice Biennale (2007). His work is included in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, the National Gallery of Australia and Te Papa, Museum of New Zealand. His latest work will be presented at the Neutral Ground Contemporary Art Forum, from Sept. 19 to Dec. 12, opening at the conclusion of the Performing Turtle Island Gathering.


Curator

Katherine Boyer is a graduate of the University of Regina with a BFA in Sculpture and an emphasis on Printmaking. As an emerging artist, Boyer's work is a crossover between traditional and non-traditional printmaking, sculptural and installation work and has received multiple awards and scholarships including a Saskatchewan Arts Board grant. Boyer also works in the field of curation, as the curator and caretaker of the First Nations University of Canada Art Gallery. Boyer is honing her skills in the field of art preparation and preservation as the caretaker of the First Nations University of Canada's permanent art collection. Boyer is excited to be participating in many professional teaching opportunities, in the classroom as well as special programming and workshops for art organizations.


Curator

Judy Anderson is a Plains Cree artist and Associate Professor of Indian Fine Arts at the First Nations University of Canada. Her works have been shown in solo and group exhibitions in Canadian galleries since 2001. She was recently invited to teach at the Prince’s School of Traditional Arts in London, England.


Curator

Dianne Ouellette is an Independent Métis filmmaker who holds a BFA (1995) in Film and Video and a BA (1993) in Theatre from the U of Regina. She has experience as a producer, writer, director, cinematographer, videographer, photographer and editor. Her films have been screened internationally in Paris, Croatia, India, Italy, Australia, San Francisco, New Jersey, Los Angeles, Telluride, Vancouver, Victoria, and Toronto. She has won a Golden Sheaf award for Best of Saskatchewan at the Yorkton International Short Film Festival 2000 for her short 35mm film Daisy, and Best Experimental in 2006 for her short 16mm film Ashes. In 2008 the 13 part documentary series she produced and directed with Framed Films Inc. was awarded a Golden Remi Award for Best Ethnic/Cultural Film and Video Production at WorldFest Houston Film Festival and was also a Winner of a Creative Excellence Saskatchewan Tourism Award. Dianne joined the staff at the U of Regina in 2013 working with Information Services and Fine Arts. While working full time she is perusing her MFA in Media Production. Presently, Dianne is working on a documentary, "Rigger," a tragic story about her brother's death while he was working on a service rig in southeast Saskatchewan.


Curator

Elizabeth Matheson has fifteen years of experience as a curator, lecturer, and writer in the field of contemporary art and moving imagery. She has worked with artist-run centers, galleries, universities, government agencies and cultural organizations in Canada, and organized conferences in a number of institutions.  Matheson lectures widely, most recently at the Armenian Center For Contemporary Experimental Art, University of Oxford and Cambridge University’s Moving Image and Institution: Cinema and the Museum in the 21st Century. Matheson also has developed pioneering approaches to collaborative and cross-disciplinary work including the co-founding of the Strandline Curatorial Collective. She serves as an advisor to Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art (Toronto), the Prince Claus Fund (Amsterdam), Victor Pinchuk Foundation (Ukraine) and is a member of the International Association of Art Critics (AICA) and the International Association of Curators of Contemporary Art (IKT). She has been published internationally and her works have been translated into several languages, and included in university curricula in the United States. Matheson has been awarded grants from the Canada Council for the Arts and a recipient of the Management of the Arts Certificate from The Banff Centre.


Organizer

Adam Martin is a Mohawk artist originally from Six Nations of the Grand River. He has served as the Artist in Residence – Urban Outreach Program and Gallery Facilitator for the MacKenzie Art Gallery. He is currently the Director of Sakewewak First Nations Artists’ Collective in Regina.


Organizer

Mary Blackstone, PhD, is a freelance dramaturg, cultural historian and educator. She is Professor Emerita in the Theatre Department at the University of Regina and Director of the Centre for the Study of Script Development, a research centre devoted to alternative approaches to the development of new dramatic work for stage, screen and new media. She served as the first Dean of Fine Arts at the University of Regina, as well as the President of the Canadian Association of Fine Arts Deans and member of the Executive of the International Council of Fine Arts Deans. She has also served on the boards of several local arts organizations including the MacKenzie Art Gallery and the Regina Symphony Orchestra. She is currently Treasurer and Chair of Research for the Saskatchewan Arts Alliance.


Organizer

Moira Day, PhD, is a Professor at the University of Saskatchewan.  A former book editor and co-editor of Theatre Research in Canada, she has edited two anthologies The Hungry Spirit, by Elsie Park Gowan, an important pioneer in the early western Canadian theatre and The West of All Possible Worlds, an anthology of contemporary Prairie playwrights. She has also contributed chapters on Jamie Portman to Crossing the Boundaries, a major study on English-language Canadian Theatre criticism, and on theatre in translation in to Les Théâtres Professionel du Canada Francophone; her other articles have appeared in Prairie Forum, Theatre Research in Canada, Essays in Theatre, Theatre InSight, Canadian Theatre Review and NeWest Review.


Conference Director

Kathleen Irwin,